Saturday, May 16, 2009

Through The Woods

Oil on Linen, 24x18. I painted the study for this on New Years Day 2008, and have wanted to paint it larger since then. It was a little weird finishing it on a day where my thermometer hit 99 degrees, but it made it feel refreshing I think. The mountain in the distance is Chief Joseph Mountain in the Wallowa Mountains, the location is just outside Enterprise, Oregon.  I want to paint all four seasons of this view at some point, there is something about it that catches my eye every time I drive by. A painting done on location always triggers memories of sights, smells, events. The study for this reminds me that the snow plow drivers in the area are a force to be reckoned with. They fly down these country lanes at top speed in enormous trucks and do not slow for anyone. And there is nowhere to park to be out of their way without getting stuck.

5 comments:

Erik said...

Funny story and beautiful painting.
You mention using a limited palette, I'm curious which colors (not brands) they are because your paintings have quite a range.

Sharon Calahan said...

I use an ultramarine blue, a cad lemon, a permanent red, a transparent red oxide and white always. Sometimes I also throw in a little pthalo blue, but very sparingly since it is such a strong hue. And everything else is mixed from these. I must be comfortable with it because I never really *think* about mixing color, I guess I'm struggling with other things, usually edges!

Erik said...

Thanks Sharon. Is that permanent red as in permanent alizarin crimson or is it a different color? That's awesome that you don't have to think about mixing colors. The less to worry about the better right?

Sharon Calahan said...

It is just an ordinary "bright permanent red". It is a synthetic red. The name probably varies slightly with manufacturer, but they all make one. So yes, my palette is limited in that with the exception of the red oxide, which is a natural earth red, I just use three primaries instead of having a palette loaded up with many colors. I know plenty of people who successfully manage a broad palette, but this is easier for me. I use the red oxide as a way to get a warmer mixed black since it is darker and warmer than the bright red.

Erik said...

Thanks Sharon, perfectly clear.
I'm trying to simplify my colormixing so limiting the number of paint piles on the palette sounds very logical. I just hadn't thought the range of mixed colors could be so broad.